15 Minimalist Home Design Principles with a Japanese Style Touch – Part 2

15 Minimalist Home Design Principles with a Japanese Style Touch

The main principle of Japanese minimalist home style
Most Japanese minimalist home styles in urban areas often contain traditional characteristics, such as a bath or stepped entrance. Likewise, many Western-style houses in Japan have one large Japanese-style room with tatami floors. The design elements of traditional Japanese houses, which are an inspiration to Western architects, can be found all over the world. The following are some important concepts of Japanese home architecture.

  1. Open space concept

Open space is very prominent in the principles of minimalist Japanese home design. This concept is intended to maximize natural lighting and ventilation into the room. Large, spacious windows and ceiling openings such as skylights, are the perfect way to add this design to your own home. Curtains or thick screens will only block this natural light. However, if this is not possible, choose simple bamboo screens or thin curtain panels.

  1. Sliding door or barrier

Traditional Japanese partitions are called Shoji, and they are an important design element in Japanese home styles. This Shoji sliding door can save space compared to most swing doors. These traditional Japanese partitions or doors are usually made of soft translucent paper attached in a wooden frame. However, modern versions of the shoji are now widely available and are usually made of glass panels in a wood or aluminum grid.

This main element does not obstruct natural lighting and natural scenery. Replacing a large expanse of walls with partitions or sliding glass paneled doors can be a great way to incorporate this Japanese home style into your home.

  1. The elements of wood and bamboo
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One of the best ways to harmonize with nature is to add natural wood elements to your home. Japanese culture is known for using wooden elements throughout their homes. The walls, doors, screen grilles and frames are all made of natural wood. In fact, you can replace the screen material from fabrics that contain wood or bamboo fibers as shown above. You can add wood elements to the floor and ceiling of your house. However, the wood element is not limited only to the interior, but also the exterior finishing of a minimalist Japanese house as shown below.

Bamboo is also very popularly used for decorative purposes in Japanese home architecture, as can be seen in the picture below.

  1. Multipurpose room

For those of you who have a tiny house, don’t worry. Flexible spaces and movable furniture can be applied to small houses. Because traditional sleeping mats (futons) can be folded up and stored in a cupboard during the day, one large room can be used for a variety of functions, for example sitting, dining and sleeping. Or, you can also use a partition as well as a sliding door so that it unites the bedroom with the family room, such as the interior of The Mighty Mini – Conformable Minimax House by Eben below.

  1. Bathtub

Ofuro, which translates as bathtub in Japanese, is a relaxing tradition that is well worth adding to your home. Ofuro is only used for bathing. All bathing activities other than bathing can be done outside the bath using a shower or tub. Japanese baths are usually small and deep which usually have a kind of bench seat. This tub is a trend in Eastern architectural style that is applied by many home owners who want to create a spa-style environment in their home.

  1. Flexible furniture

Because many Japanese home designs do not separate the room with furniture for certain purposes such as the sitting room or TV room, we can still imitate the simplicity of Japanese home architecture into our homes. Most of Japanese furniture is placed directly on the floor or on the floor, such as the use of floor cushions and chairs or floor sofas instead of ordinary chairs or sofas.

  1. Popular colors

In keeping with the natural beauty of the outside world, Japanese homes usually contain simple natural colors. The dominant color comes from the elements of brown wood and green plants. The floors were usually wood or gray tile and most of the walls were replaced with screens covered in frosted paper.

This design makes for a simple color palette that is very neutral. Try incorporating these natural wood elements through wood shelves, wall panels, and floors, or add natural stone gray tones to your floors or even your furniture.

Also, don’t forget to add lots of green through natural ornamental plants. Simplicity is key when choosing a color palette for a Japanese home style.

  1. Zen meditation room

Try diving deep into the peaceful Japanese culture by creating a very serene space in your home for meditation, tea or yoga.

Find a quiet place in your own home to put down a floor pillow for meditation or just to sit and relax. Don’t forget to add a water element around it as the splash of running water will drown out any annoying noise.

Do you want to have a house designed in a minimalist Japanese home style like the picture above? If so, what would you add to your home to achieve this look?

15 Minimalist Home Design Principles with a Japanese Style Touch

15 Minimalist Home Design Principles with a Japanese Style Touch

japanese home design element

One word that describes the Japanese home design heritage: Zen. Yes, simplicity with a peaceful nuance represents the simple design of Japanese culture. Thousands of years of tradition have influenced Japanese home architecture and interior design aesthetics, creating an environment of serenity and high cultural value.

Japanese home style develops around a life that is clean and free from clutter, maintaining balance, order, ancient traditions, and a love of natural beauty. By taking advantage of different levels of floors, corners, and the contrast between open spaces and comfortable corners, all these elements have created a unique Japanese minimalist home that reflects both sensibility and comfort.

Japanese home styles tend to be small and located close to each other, whether in urban or rural areas. However, the main characteristics of traditional Japanese home design are privacy, natural light, protection from some elements and a connection with the outdoors — no matter the size of the house or its location.

The main principle of Japanese minimalist home style
Most Japanese minimalist home styles in urban areas often contain traditional characteristics, such as a bath or stepped entrance. Likewise, many Western-style houses in Japan have one large Japanese-style room with tatami floors. The design elements of traditional Japanese houses, which are an inspiration to Western architects, can be found all over the world. The following are some important concepts of Japanese home architecture.

  1. The main gate

The main element of delineating the boundaries between public and private spaces in Japanese home architecture starts at the entrance gate of a property. This Japanese house-style roofed gate separates the street from the residence which has the impression of being closed.

The modern-roofed gate in Ashari Architects’ Palembang House is also an adaptation of Japanese house design, which always applies vertical or horizontal line elements in most of its gate designs.

The Concrete Box House in Houston, Texas, by Christopher Robertson, also applies a minimalist Japanese house design with a high concrete fence and a gate without a pivot door model.

  1. Limits of privacy

Privacy from the road and surrounding houses is achieved through the walls at the land boundary. This also applies to Japanese minimalist home designs. Block concrete is the material most commonly used for the walls of Japanese houses, both in cities and villages, but some large houses use stone walls with a combination of wooden fences, such as the PRIVAT HOUSE KLATEN house created by Hendra Budi Architect.

  1. Wide roof

Traditional Japanese roofs are generally designed to drain the heavy rainwater from the roof of the house. The wide cantilevered roof allows residents to open the door for ventilation without letting rainwater enter the house. Japanese minimalist home design can also adapt this supporting element.

  1. Wide veranda

Apart from connecting each room, the veranda in the form of a wide and long hallway known as engawa becomes a barrier between the inner and outer spaces. This veranda also serves to maximize light and air in the house.

Apart from connecting each room, the veranda in the form of a wide and long hallway known as engawa becomes a barrier between the inner and outer spaces. This veranda also serves to maximize light and air in the house.

Japanese house architecture is generally in a land that is oriented north-south, with the main bedroom facing south, to ensure stable sunlight throughout the day. View is very important in Japanese home style, ideally mountains or water, but more often it is garden. Natural lighting is considered a major characteristic of Japanese home design.

The Japanese house style W_House created by Studio Air Putih makes use of many openings and outdoor spaces to maximize ventilation and natural lighting.

  1. Outer-inside transition

The transitional space between outside and inside in Japanese house architecture is called genkan, which is an area for receiving visitors and a place to change shoes with house slippers that are removed before stepping on the tatami floor. With a space function similar to that of a foyer, genkan usually has a shelf or cabinet called a getabako that is used to store shoes and decorative items such as ceramics, flowers, or works of art. This entrance area also has a tokonoma (niche) for storing scrolls of calligraphy paper and other artwork, as well as ikebana (traditional flower arrangements).

By adapting the style of this Japanese house, Delution Architect’s Splow House creates an entrance area with a clean and simple design. This console-style concrete bench can double as a seat, as well as to place sandals or shoes under it.

  1. Nature in space

Japanese culture emphasizes love and respect for nature. The best way to maintain a strong connection with nature is to include natural elements in the room. Water is one of the strongest elements that accentuate the distinctive architectural features of Japanese houses. You can add a fish pond to your indoor garden to highlight this element.

Adding traditional Japanese plants, such as bonsai and bamboo, to your home will give a little touch of Japanese culture. However, you can also add other types of greenery and still create a similar style. Consider adding slender plants like palms or orchids. Whatever type of plant you choose, stick to simple, natural, and green principles.

The indoor nature of the Japanese home style can also be achieved by adding large and spacious windows that allow natural views from all over. Like the bedroom below, large sliding glass doors incorporate a serene natural view into the room.

READ PART 2

Creative Bedroom Designs for Many People

Creative Bedroom Designs for Many People

How can a narrow bedroom accommodate so many beds? A clever way to get around the narrow space is with the bunk beds arranged vertically. Designing and arranging a bunk bed or bunk bed requires ingenuity. Arrange a comfortable bed placement while still presenting a charming architectural aesthetic.

Bed sheet color selection

One-color sheet combined with a simple patterned bolster pillowcase (Source: InMySweetDesign.com)

A bedroom with 3 or more beds will feel tidier, more spacious, and comfortable with the right choice of sheets. Choose sheets in basic colors or white, simple patterns, and not too patterned.

Sailor motif bedspread in the three-bedroom bedroom by Chango & Co. (source: houzz.com)

Think about the age of the occupants of the room

Bedrooms with bunk beds must be able to accommodate children and adults, especially if guests often come to stay.

Bedroom with 2 queen beds and 2 single beds by Sita Montgomery Interiors (source: Cameo Homes Inc.)

Kids or teens will love climbing into bed. Parents can sleep on the bottom. A bedroom with a bed arrangement like this can accommodate more than 6 people.

Bedroom designs for more than 6 people by Asher Associates Architects (source: homebunch.com)

Be stylish and stay safe

L-shaped bunk bed in the corner of a homes resort by Suzanne Nichols Design Group (source: homedesignlover.com)

Bunk beds are deliberately arranged in an L shape in the corner of the room and are given a protector for the upper bunk so that they are safe for children. The distance between the lower matrass and the upper cot is at least 150 cm so that you don’t stumble your head.

A bedroom with a certain style will be especially attractive to children. Especially if it is designed with unique materials and shapes by Abby Hetherington Interiors (source: homedesignlover.com)

The placement of a larger size bed at the bottom in an upright position not only provides relief, but safety for children who sleep on the upper bunk. The protective iron on the edge of the top bed is also needed for safety, especially if the users are children.

Place it against the wall

You don’t have to order a bed specifically so that the bedroom can accommodate many people. The bed is the same size that can be bought at any store, can be arranged and arranged in tight spaces.

This bunk bed does not need to be ordered specifically. There are already shops (ikea) that sell them collectively. (source: Eucaliptosnon.com)

At the bottom of the bed, there is a shelf to put luggage. It’s a clever way of storing things and keeping a space tidy, comfortable, and spacious.

Arrange Three

Beds in a narrow space with a high enough ceiling can be arranged in three. Arrange the bed in a zigzag position in the corner of the room for the safety of the top bed.

Three bunk beds with a zigzag position (source: pinterest)

Add security with iron or wood protection on the edge of the bed. The bottom bed should be attached to the floor so that the top bed is not too high.

Tuck in the lobby

Another clever idea is to place the bunk bed in a fairly wide bunk.

4 contemporary cantilever beds in a ranch house by Magnolia Homes (source: homedesignlover.com)

Attach the side of the bed to the wall. Use steel wire to hang the bed. Add a ladder as access, as well as a bed holder. For guests who stay overnight, the space under the lower bed can be used for placing luggage and other luggage.

Murphy bed or wall bed in the hallway by Tom Hurt Architecture (source: houzz.com)

When not in use, the bed can be folded against and parallel to the wall. The back hallway was neat and spacious.

Put it under the stairs

The space under the stairs which is usually a waste, would be very useful if it was transformed into an area for a bunk bed.

Bunk bed under the stairs (source: remodelista.com)

The arrangement of the shelves as a ladder

Be shrewd in getting around limited space. 3.5m x 1m space can accommodate 2 bunk beds and lots of shelves. Not only functional, but creative and unique.

Shelf as a ladder on a bunk bed (source: amenagementdesign.com)

Combine with the play area

Bunk beds for children should be comfortable, safe and enjoyable. Design a unique ladder with a large rope that helps children climb the ladder. Also provide a skateboard. This skateboard is not only for playing, but it is safer to get off when you wake up and your child’s eyes are still sleepy.

Bunk bed with play area (source: My Dream House)

Take advantage of the space under the roof

The space under the roof is usually quite large, but rather low. Arrange the beds in a row, no need to stack up.

The area under the roof as a bedroom (source: trishatroutz.blogspot.co.id)

Make the most of the space under the roof. Think about the arrangement of possible bed placement and still pay attention to the aspect of comfort.

Three bunk beds in the space under the roof (source: archimagz.com)

Unlimited creative ideas

Minimalist children’s bed with study table (source: kedaimebeljati.com)

This room is equipped with 2 queen beds with bookshelves as a privacy barrier. Under the sofabed there are 6 shelves that are not only storage areas, but as a sofa bed base when used as a bed. This space can accommodate at least a sleeping area for 8 people.

Calculate the number of people who need to fit in the bedroom. Think of creative ideas that can be applied in the room you have. Remember, there are no restrictions on designing. What is important, the space must be functional to accommodate all needs.